LessLoss Dynamic Filtering Power Cable 
Home Theater AC Power AC Power
Written by Roger Coakes   
Tuesday, 30 June 2009

Cables have always been a subject of skeptical scrutiny for me.  Many, many years ago, cables were simply cables; absent of any dissection of quality.  My weekly discussions with fellow installers were always spent on vehemently arguing over equipment performance rather than the cables running said components.  These days, cables are the subject of rampant discussion and choosing the correct cables often means wading through lengthy manufacturer diatribes to let your ears make the correct choice.  

Liudas Motekaitis (aka Louis Motek), the managing director of LessLoss, was kind enough to send us over a batch of 10 dynamic filtering power cables (DFPC) in a variety of lengths.  Packaged tightly in plastic bags, the cables made the overseas trip from Lithuania safely and landed on my doorstep the following week.  The cables are generally tough to damage to begin with and tightly wound in a twisting black sheath (presumably reduce inductance / capacitance and increase flexibility).  The red polycarbonate connectors at each end felt sturdy and easy to grasp due to the slightly flattened sides.  I popped off the power cables on my Classé DAC-1 as well as the amps running to the Revel fronts and installed the LessLoss cables.  The connecters fit in very snugly, but I did have to rearrange the position of the amp to deal with cable length.

After powering up the system, I was immediately taken aback.  I would equate it to the first time I hooked up a proper DAC to a sound system that was woefully absent, in terms of quality elevation.  The sound stage had been slyly altered, increasing the depth and enveloping me within the sound image.  There was a change in the clarity of the midrange immediately and an overall decrease in the background.  I was rather shocked that my wife could even hear the difference, a gracious woman that sighs in desperation every time I pull her into the room to listen changes after replacing a piece of equipment.  I immediately changed back to my previous set to verify the difference.  It’s shockingly evident on day one, even without the proper burn-in time.   

 

Lessloss DFPC

 


The LessLoss site details a transformation in about a week for settling / burn-in, but you can be the judge. I took a couple weeks to allow the cables to settle into my system and spent that time reading up on DFPCs.  The wire inside the DFPC goes through a specific metallurgical treatment called FlowFlux.  The result is a highly resistant metal layer over the main copper wire.  This layer effectively accepts undesirably frequencies pushed out from the copper core, hence becomes an in-cable filter.  This level of filtering provides clean AC power and cuts out the number of physical steps that a traditional power filter or regenerator setup would provide.  The DFPC essentially filters without restricting the flow of power.

I sat down with a couple different recordings to launching into a little critical dissection of the changes in quality with the DFPCs.  The first was a SACD of Simple Symphony No. 4 (Britten), something of a chamber-symphonic showpiece performed by a small string ensemble.  The musical style is designed to be light, effortless and cheerful.  The light touch of the strings was dramatically improved and the sound field felt broader than it had with my previous setup.  I moved onto Sonata for 2 Pianos in D Major (Mozart) performed by the Dena Piano Duo.  The piece interweaves two piano parts and becomes something completely fresh.  There was an evident distinction of the notes that I hadn’t heard before in previous listening sessions.  At the same time, the mesh of the two parts flowed more beautifully and definitely had a warmer, more lifelike quality to the tone.

After about another hour of classical listening, I was hard pressed to find anything negative to say about the quality of the cables.  I popped in 65 Roses: The Buster Williams Trio and brought up a couple of my favorite tracks.  The bass in Concierto de Aranjuez definitely popped more and had an elevated level of tightness.  Song for Abdullah, a dramatic little piano number, had fantastic clarity and increased rich, emotional detail with slight nuances that I hadn’t heard before.  It's also one of my favorite piano melodies.  Finally, I listened to Rodgers & Hammerstein’s Surrey with the Fringe on Top, a fairly upbeat number.  The distinction between the drums, piano and bass were amazingly clear and was even more evident when I popped my old cables back into the system.

I wasn’t surprised that the LessLoss DFPCs provided a modification in the overall quality of the sound from my system, but I was surprised that the change was predominant immediately and even more defined after allowing the cables to settle for a few weeks.  It’s also surprising to find cables of this caliber at such an inexpensive cost, compared to their competitors.  A 2 meter LessLoss DFPC runs about $600.  I can easily recommend the LessLoss DFPCs as a necessary upgrade for any audiophile seeking more dynamic sound, preferably replacing the power cables for every audio component in their system.





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