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Shrek the Third  Print E-mail
HD DVD Animation
Written by Noah Fleming   
Tuesday, 01 January 2008

0 of 0 people found the following review helpful

Overall rating (weighted)
3.8
Movie Rating:
3.0
Audio Quality:
4.0
Video Quality:
4.5
Supplements:
2.5
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In what seems like a time of sequels, and even more so, trilogies, all your favorite fairytale creatures are back in “Shrek the Third”. After a so-so performance in “Shrek 2”, creator Mike Myers is back in the swing of things with the third installment. While not as ingenious as the first Shrek film, “Shrek the Third” delivers a much more coherent and laugh-filled film than number 2.

In film number one our fearless Shrek (Mike Myers) went off to rescue the princess in the highest room of the tallest tower and battle the fire-breathing dragon, all to get the deed to his swamp back from the sinister Lord Farquaad (John Lithgow). In the second film, the Fairy Godmother and her son Prince Charming plotted to take the princess away from Shrek and take over the kingdom of Far Far Away. The third film does a decent job of picking up from the end of film number two. The Fairy Godmother is still deceased, Princess Fiona's father, King Harold (John Cleese) is still stuck in his frog state, and Prince Charming (Rupert Everett) is now hated by all the land.

With King Harold's failing health, Shrek and Fiona are summoned from their swamp to fill in for the King and Queen. Shortly thereafter, King Harold croaks on his lily pad. However, he first names Shrek as the new King and reveals the only other heir to the throne, Arthur. Some might be clever enough to realize he means the legendary King Arthur right away.

Shrek, never wanting any of the spotlight throughout the three films, sets sail to find the Arthur kid. Presented with comical timing, Fiona shouts from the dock that she is pregnant. Shrek is uneasy with this information, and it will formulate the deeper storyline for the more adult crowd.

With the help of a retired Merlin, Shrek, Donkey, and Puss in Boots get themselves and Arthur back to Far Far Away. However, while the mice were away the cat played, so to speak. Prince Charming seized the entire kingdom and imprisoned Fiona, and was cleverly awaiting Shrek's return. In grand tradition of the Shrek films, the end comes down to an emotional battle scene, in which our heroes naturally arise victoriously.

The opening MPAA rating screen rated it PG, for some “crude and swashbuckling humor”. I didn't really find there to be any crude humor in this film. However, I may be de-sensitized to the subject matter. But I don't think that a “G” rating could have been out of the question.

“Shrek the Third” brings into play, many of our beloved fairytale characters. The girls will enjoy seeing tea parties and action scenes with their heroines, Snow White, Cinderella, Sleeping Beauty, among others. The three blind mice, grandmother-eating wolf, three little pigs, Pinocchio, Captain Hook, Headless Horseman, among a ton of others, all return to play there little parts in this film. I believe the most interesting additions were the legends of Arthur, Lancelot, and Guinevere.

Unfortunately, “Shrek the Third” does not pose a threat to the originality of the first Shrek film. I was hoping for some competition, but the third film falls a bit short. The script is full of “empty threat” dialogues and the showiness of too many legendary characters. It lacked the comical banter between Shrek and Donkey and the wit of Princess Fiona. Fiona has become so rooted in her Ogre ways that she has lost that spunk in her attitude that made the first Shrek such a delight. The second film had the wonderful Fairy Godmother to keep the wit alive. But the wit was sorely lacking in “Shrek the Third”. Not all was lost, as the film did reach back to the success of the first two films in regards to music montages. “Shrek” was known for its wonderful, heartfelt music sequences, using some rare, but perfect-fitting songs. Such examples are the “Hallelujah” by Rufus Wainwright and “My Beloved Monster” by Eel sequences. This film had a couple of those moments, although, not quite as powerful.

The video presentation of “Shrek the Third” is where the film truly shines. It is by far the best HD DVD video transfer I have since thus far. Now, one must take into account that the film is entirely created on the computer, which is known to have immaculate lines and shapes. The film does not have to deal with grainy and scratched 35mm film transfers. The colors are nicely saturated, with an incredible contrast that lends so much depth to the scenes. The characters are clearly separated from the backgrounds, and nearly leap off the screen. There are absolutely no compression or motion artifacts present in any scene, especially not in any fast motion sequences. The film did a much better job in the presentations of bright, day sequences than it did for night sequences. The night shots were a bit too tinted in favor of blue. There is absolutely no need for edge enhancement anywhere in the film. A truly stunning visual presentation.

The audio quality was not quite as impressive as the visual aspect. While by no means horrible, it did lack in a few areas. The surrounds were impressively used at times, and then disappointedly forgotten at others. For example, the exploding upright piano sent shards of wood flying at the audience and continued way off in the distance. However, the shards of wood sparsely make there way into the surround channels. Ambience was okay in the surrounds, but not impressive. The dialogue was clean and crisp. Overall, the audio track sounded a bit too compressed. The only audio option is Dolby Digital Plus at 1.5Mbps. A Dolby TrueHD or Uncompressed PCM track would have been a much better choice for this film.

The special features on this HD DVD are a bit tricky. They cannot all be accessed from the overlay menu, only the home menu. All the extras are presented in 1080p, which is a nice change from most HD DVDs with their SD extras.

“Meet the Cast” introduces us to the voice talents of the film. “Shrek Tech” is a quick featurette on the editing process behind “Shrek the Third”. The “Lost Scenes” covers four proposed scenes for the film. The most you can hope for from this featurette are some pencil sketches. Nothing is a final render. “Big Green Goofs” is a standard blooper reel. “Shrek's Guide to Parenthood” provides parenting advice. “Donkey Dance” is quick music video of Donkey dancing to “The Safety Dance”. The “DreamWorks Animation Jukebox” featurette allows you to watch a musical clip from a variety of films, which as of now have not been announced for the HD format. Finally there are two trailers, neither of which is for the Shrek films. “The Animators' Corner” allows you to watch the entire film as a serious of drawings, with symbols present during playback that allow access to the “Lost Scenes” at the correct moment. “My Menus” consists of different skins for the user to choose from for the overall appearance of the menu bar. There are several other features on this HD DVD, some of which are web-enabled. However, none of them are really that interesting.

“Shrek the Third” is entertaining for adults and children, but in almost no way lives up to the original “Shrek”. The video quality of this film makes all the boring storylines and plot holes easy to overlook. Young children will be mesmerized by the colors. I know my nephew was. Likely though, children and adults alike will become bored with “Shrek the Third” fairly quickly. Luckily the running time is only 90 minutes. Definitely a disc to own for video demo material, but might just be a rental for the movie.

Studio DreamWorks Home Entertainment
MPAA Rating PG
Starring Mike Myers, Cameron Diaz, Eddie Murphy, Antonio Banderas, Julie Andrews, John Cleese, Rupert Everett, Eric Idle, Justin Timberlake, Cody Cameron, Larry King, Ian McShane
Director Chris Miller
Film Release Year 2007
Disc Release Year 2007
Resolution(s) 1080p (main feature) • 1080p (supplements)
Aspect Ratio 1.85:1
Running Time 1 hr. 32 mins.
Sound Formats English Dolby Digital Plus 5.1 • French Dolby Digital Plus 5.1 • Spanish Dolby Digital Plus 5.1
Subtitles English SDH • French • Spanish
Special Features "Meet the Cast", "Shrek Tech", Lost Scenes, Big Green Goofs, "Shrek's Guide To Parenthood", Donkey Dance, DreamWorks Animation Jukebox, Theatrical Trailers, Merlin's Magic Crystal Ball, Learn the Donkey Dance, "How to be Green", My Menus, The Animator's Corner, The World of Shrek, Shrek's Trivia Track, Donkey's Coloring Book
Discuss The Review Here http://www.avrevforum.com
Reviewer Noah Fleming







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