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-   -   Anybody know why LCD's suffer from motion blur? (http://www.avrev.com/forum/plasma-lcd-hdtv/2174-anybody-know-why-lcds-suffer-motion-blur.html)

rex 07-05-2008 08:53 PM

Anybody know why LCD's suffer from motion blur?
 
I was wondering why newer LCD displays with refresh rates of 120Hz and response times less than 8 milliseconds still suffer from motion blur? Does anyone know why?

Loves2Watch 07-07-2008 11:28 PM

Re: Anybody know why LCD's suffer from motion blur?
 
Response time is the biggest factor.

rex 07-08-2008 02:17 AM

Re: Anybody know why LCD's suffer from motion blur?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Loves2Watch (Post 16389)
Response time is the biggest factor.

Right, that is what I thought too. But even the latest LCD's with very fast response times, still have motion blurr. If the response time < 8ms then each pixel has time to fully respond each time the screen is refreshed at 120Hz, because 1/120 = .008 sec = 8ms, approximately.
My hunch is that the motion blurr has something to do with the way the human eye sees images, or processes visual information. Though I don't know why for sure. Nor do I understand the difference with plasmas which don't suffer from motion blurr even at slower refresh rates like 60Hz. Puzzling isn't it?

Ttone305 07-09-2008 09:54 AM

Re: Anybody know why LCD's suffer from motion blur?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by rex (Post 16392)
Though I don't know why for sure. Nor do I understand the difference with plasmas which don't suffer from motion blurr even at slower refresh rates like 60Hz. Puzzling isn't it?


Plasma's do not suffer from motion blur at all. This is because of their pixel structure has an instant response time. Either the pixel is on, or its off. As for LCD's with the backlight being constantly on, each pixel has to turn off, block light, and process incoming signal and turn back on, and I think this has something to do with the pixel [trying to] block light and process an incoming signal and turn back on. I think it is moreso noticable on larger displays of > 46". A 32", 37", and 40" I believe are the optimal screen sizes for LCD's where motion blur is minimized, but when the screen is larger, as in 46", 52", 57", 70", ect, the tiniest of details are amplified, and we see them more clearly, or blurry in this case.

7625 QSC 08-13-2008 08:16 AM

Re: Anybody know why LCD's suffer from motion blur?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by rex (Post 16360)
I was wondering why newer LCD displays with refresh rates of 120Hz and response times less than 8 milliseconds still suffer from motion blur? Does anyone know why?

Rex,
This is a very good question! I am not very knowledgeable on this subject but this is what I could find.....
LCD Motion blur is largely caused by the hold-type rendering method of LCDs together with the motion pursuing function of human visual system. This hold-type motion blur happens not on the LCD screens but in human eyes, so it cannot be captured by a still camera and therefore is physiological. Even if response time is reduced to zero, motion-blur will be observed.
So it appears, LCDs don't suffer from motion blur but the brain does.

Here are the names of 2 papers that provided this information:
LCD MOTION BLUR MODELING AND ANALYSIS - Sharp Labs of America
Nonlinearity compensated smooth frame insertion for motion-blur reduction in LCD - Samsung Electronics Co

rex 08-13-2008 01:49 PM

Re: Anybody know why LCD's suffer from motion blur?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by 7625 QSC (Post 17045)
This hold-type motion blur happens not on the LCD screens but in human eyes, so it cannot be captured by a still camera and therefore is physiological. Even if response time is reduced to zero, motion-blur will be observed.
So it appears, LCDs don't suffer from motion blur but the brain does.

Here are the names of 2 papers that provided this information:
LCD MOTION BLUR MODELING AND ANALYSIS - Sharp Labs of America
Nonlinearity compensated smooth frame insertion for motion-blur reduction in LCD - Samsung Electronics Co

That is very interesting. Thanks for the information.
However, if motion blur would still occur in the mind, even with a zero response time, then I still don't see why it doesn't happen with plasmas too.


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