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Old 08-14-2009   #18
GrtGrfx
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Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 44
Default Re: Are cables the weak link in your system?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Loves2Watch View Post
What an arrogant, insulting and totally wrong post.
You know, something interesting occurred to me today. We (all of us posting on these forums) are computer users, whether experts as I happen to be, or just typical casually-informed users. Let's take an example from the computer world we know and love.

You can buy a $40 SATA or CAT 5 ethernet cable for your new PC or Mac at a retail store. It delivers 0s and 1s between a drive and the motherboard, allowing you to access your data. Or you can buy a $2 SATA or ethernet cable from another dealer (probably online), which does the same thing. If A SINGLE DATA BYTE of the file you are accessing is not transmitted by the cable, your file will not open, or your program might crash, or the text/image/video display incorrectly, or who knows what else. Therefore we can say with certainty that barring a defective product, ANY cable you buy with the appropriate (SATA, CAT 5) spec should deliver 100% of the signal, exactly as it was recorded, 100% of the time. In the computer world, there's no such thing as "well it isn't AS NICE as the higher-priced cable." If it doesn't deliver 100%, it's a failed product and cannot be sold.

Also, note that there are no manufacturers in the computer world advertising $2,000 cables for your computer or network (okay, there's Denon with their $500 ethernet "interconnect" but they're laughed at by anyone who knows networking). Why? because they haven't a leg to stand on justifying such a high price.

How could audio or video cables be any different? Either they deliver 100% of the signal or they don't, because wire is wire and connectors are connectors. The only limiting factor, as far as I can see, is degradation caused by distance, which would be the result of signal loss. Take extra-long length out of the situation and any cable designed to fit into a certain port should deliver an identical signal. At that point, the differentiator is the connector end and whether it's making contact with the device.

If you trust your computer to work with its cables, then you should similarly trust any AV cable to do the same. Cables should be rated for distance, NOT for "sweetness and accuracy." And fancy covers, exotic materials and high prices don't equal higher quality reproduction. THIS is why an engineer can confidently mix his audio with Radio Shack cabling and expect good results. Because it shouldn't matter.
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"I have always wished that my computer would be as easy to use as my telephone.
My wish has come true. I no longer know how to use my telephone."
Bjarne Stroustrup (creator of C++)

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Last edited by GrtGrfx; 08-14-2009 at 09:43 AM..
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