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Old 01-29-2008   #152
gstarr
Super Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Charleston, SC
Posts: 105
Default Re: HD Disc Format War Not Over By a Long Shot

"Now look at hddvd. An excellent format that was fully equiped out the gate and affordable. Most discs that are provide better picture, sound and extras than the dvd counterpart. This format is easily more successful than either dvd audio and sacd but has a real lack of players. For all intent and purposes Toshiba is the only manufacturer. I hope their labtops continue to have hddvd playback and newer 4th gen players come out. As of now this remains to be seen. Say 10 years from now my XA2 craps out. Without the hardware to play the discs I am out of luck. I fully see these 2 HD formats as the last forms of physical media we see in films.

I have no intent on trading my Warner hddvd's for the bluray version as I am gaining nothing in PQ, could be going from True HD to DD and am missing IME extras and the like. The same goes formy Paramount hddvd's. I would far rather have the film with 1.5 mbps DD+ than 640 kbps DD. I would far rather have a VC1 or AVC encode than MPEG-2 and yes I have compared them back to back."

1.8 What video codecs will Blu-ray support?


MPEG-2 - enhanced for HD, also used for playback of DVDs and HDTV recordings.
MPEG-4 AVC - part of the MPEG-4 standard also known as H.264 (High Profile and Main Profile).
SMPTE VC-1 - standard based on Microsoft's Windows Media Video (WMV) technology.

Please note that this simply means that all Blu-ray players and recorders will have to support playback of these video codecs, it will still be up to the movie studios to decide which video codec(s) they use for their releases.


1.9 What audio codecs will Blu-ray support?


Linear PCM (LPCM) - up to 8 channels of uncompressed audio. (mandatory)
Dolby Digital (DD) - format used for DVDs, 5.1-channel surround sound. (mandatory)
Dolby Digital Plus (DD+) - extension of Dolby Digital, 7.1-channel surround sound. (optional)
Dolby TrueHD - lossless encoding of up to 8 channels of audio. (optional)
DTS Digital Surround - format used for DVDs, 5.1-channel surround sound. (mandatory)
DTS-HD High Resolution Audio - extension of DTS, 7.1-channel surround sound. (optional)
DTS-HD Master Audio - lossless encoding of up to 8 channels of audio. (optional)

Please note that this simply means that Blu-ray players and recorders will have to support playback of these audio codecs, it will still be up to the movie studios to decide which audio codec(s) they use for their releases.

Both formats can be recorded in the same formats and can have the same audio codecs. There is no difference, except for the early Blu Ray machines which were missing some abilities. In a few months when Blu Ray 2.0 comes out it will have everything that HD has--if not more. The person doing the recording and mastering decides on the codecs--not the format. Both formats have the same capabilities.

If you are worried about your HD collections, buy one or two of the Toshiba's that are now on very steep clearance sales.

I kept my Pioneer Elite 59avi universal player for SACD's and DVD-A's, not tomention all other discs besides Hi-Def discs.

Eventually you will be able to download your HD collection on multi-terabyte hard drives and even make a hard drive back-up.

If you buy that many Hi Def discs, the cost of a new Blu Ray shortly gets amortized in the cost of all the discs one buys.

I just don't think it is anything to get very upset over. I've lost far morein the stock market in the last month:-)

Greg
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