equipment reviews
This Month's Featured Equipment Reviews
In Appreciation of the Harbeth Compact 7 ES-3
RHA MA750i In Ear Headphones Review
Thiel TM3 Loudspeaker Review
Reviewed: MusicScope Analysis Software by Xivero
Fluance XL7F Loudspeakers Review
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Sunday, 01 May 2005 ,  Written by Tim Hart
RBH MC Series Home Theater Speaker System
Introduction In the heyday of hi-fi, it seemed like there was a wide gap between the highest-end speakers and speakers the masses could afford. Today, things are different in that the budget-minded audio-video performance enthusiast now has the opportunity to buy speakers that can hang with the high-end players at a price that is only fractionally more than the speakers found advertised on TV infomercials, along with noise-canceling headphones. For over 25 years, RBH has been producing a wide range of performance loudspeakers that are designed and engineered from their Utah-based facility. I first became aware of their work four years ago, when AVR editor Bryan Southard invited me over to his home to get a second opinion on the Signature series that he had installed for review. I remember really admiring the fit, finish and workmanship. I was impressed with the solidness of the enclosures and the smooth, refined sound that they produced. One of the ...
Tuesday, 01 March 2005 ,  Written by Joe Hageman
RHT How To: Whole House Audio How-To: A Homeowner’s Guide to Planning a Whole-House Audio Distribution System By Joe Hageman March 2005 In Part 1 of this How-To adventure, I discussed the various types of audio distribution systems available. But which one is right for you? Do you have to spend upwards of $50K and rewire your entire house to accommodate dozens of pairs of speakers and LCD touch screens? Of course not, but as is the case with most things in life, you get what you pay for. Choosing the right audio distribution system for you depends on many different factors from the size of your house to how long you plan on living there. More important, it depends on your lifestyle and how often you plan on using the system. If you never entertain or lead such a busy work life that you’re rarely at home, spending a small fortune on a distributed ...
Tuesday, 01 February 2005 ,  Written by Joe Hageman
RHT How To: Whole House Audio How-To: A Homeowner’s Guide to Planning a Whole-House Audio Distribution System By Joe Hageman February 2005 The dream: To own an affordable whole-house audio system that effortlessly pipes music throughout your home, where all the components “talk” harmoniously to one another as if they were one symbiotic unit. Reality: This stuff is expensive, can be down-right tricky to operate and even though we can beam back images from the Red Planet, we can’t seem to figure out how to get audio/video components to talk to one another without a virtual argument ensuing. Welcome to the wonderful world of custom home audio distribution, where the homeowner is a slave to a bunch of temperamental black boxes often run by proprietary software that even the most ardent computer whiz would struggle to figure out.
Saturday, 01 January 2005 ,  Written by Jerry Del Colliano
ReQuest Fusion Pro 250 Music Server
Introduction These days, the landscape of traditional audio/video source components is changing at a blinding pace. In the glory days of high-end audio, you had your compact disc player and/or a turntable – maybe a VCR and a laserdisc player – and you were considered by darn near everybody as pretty ahead of the technical curve. More than a decade later in today’s connected home, your sources make up a completely new cast of characters. Beyond the ubiquitous DVD player, you might find the HD Tuner/DVR, a D-VHS deck, a satellite radio receiver and, with increasing likelihood, a music server. The ReQuest Fusion 250 is a $9,000 music server designed to work with your home theater, as well as your distributed whole-house audio system. The immediate question is – how is the ReQuest different than a fractionally-priced iPod? The most notable way is how the ReQuest is reliably controlled via RS232. The second most important issue ...
Saturday, 01 January 2005 ,  Written by Ben Shyman
Revel Performa F32 Loudspeakers
Introduction Revel is the high-end speaker division of Harman Specialty Group, a division of multi-billion-dollar conglomerate Harman International, makers of high-end Lexicon and Mark Levinson audio-video electronics. Revel’s Performa line is more modestly priced than their swanky Ultima products, which are reserved for the most demanding and wealthy consumers. Revel has taken much of what they have learned through extensive research and development of their Ultima line and employed this in their Performa speakers. Evidence of this can be seen in the fact that many of Revel’s products have received widespread acclaim among consumers and critics, including the Performa F30s, which Audio Video Revolution selected as a Best of 2001 product. While the Performa F30s were a sonic marvel, especially considering their price, they left a lot to be desired aesthetically. With the recently introduced Performa F32s replacing the Performa F30 speakers, Revel has completely redesigned the look of their entry-level floor-standing speaker. Gone is the art deco ...
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