equipment reviews
This Month's Featured Equipment Reviews
In Appreciation of the Harbeth Compact 7 ES-3
RHA MA750i In Ear Headphones Review
Thiel TM3 Loudspeaker Review
Reviewed: MusicScope Analysis Software by Xivero
Fluance XL7F Loudspeakers Review
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Thursday, 01 May 2008 ,  Written by Andrew Robinson
Lexicon MC-12 HD Music and Cinema Processor
Introduction If you’ve contemplated building a home theater with the utmost performance in mind, you’ve no doubt considered the Harman International brand Lexicon. When it comes to outfitting true performance-based home theaters that rival some of the best movie houses in the business, Lexicon has to rest somewhere near the summit. No other brand, save maybe Genelec and JBL, has such a storied history in professional cinema and mastering applications as Lexicon. However, in recent years, rapid evolution surrounding video formats and connection options, mainly high-definition video and HDMI, have given companies like Lexicon a moment of pause. This has allowed large, mass-producing giants from Japan to muscle their way into the playing field and even briefly take it over. However, with the arrival of the Lexicon MC-12 HD processor, the once mighty king of home theater has returned and is ...
Thursday, 24 April 2008 ,  Written by AVRev.com
LG 50PY3D Plasma HDTV
The Basics: LG offers both plasma and LCD HDTVs, and the 50PY3D was LG’s first 50-inch 1080p plasma. As such, it is priced somewhat higher than several of the company’s 720p 50-inch models. The 50PY3D has a healthy connection panel that includes three HDMI inputs and two component video inputs, all of which accept 1080p/60 and 1080p/24. RS-232 and IR ports allow for integration into a more advanced control system, and there’s a USB port for MP3/JPEG playback. While the video menu does not have an extensive amount of picture adjustments, it does provide direct access to advanced white-balance controls, and it gives you the option to enable LG’s XD processing, with contrast, color and noise settings. The menu also offers several features to counteract the effects of short-term image retention, plus an energy-saving mode that limits light output to reduce power ...
Tuesday, 08 April 2008 ,  Written by AVRev.com
LG 47LBX LCD HDTV
The Basics: LG offers both plasma and LCD HDTVs. This 47-inch, 1080p LCD hails from the company’s higher-end Opus lineup, and it utilizes TruMotion 120Hz technology, which doubles the TV’s frame rate from 60 to 120Hz to reduce motion blur and render smoother movement. It also uses a Super In-Plane Switching (S-IPS) panel with a 5ms response time. The 47LBX has a healthy connection panel that includes three HDMI, two component video and one PC inputs, all of which accept 1080p. RS-232 and IR ports allow for integration into a more advanced control system, and there’s a USB port for MP3/JPEG playback. The onscreen menu sports a nice assortment of picture adjustments, including an adjustable backlight, direct access to advanced white-balance controls, low/high/off TruMotion options and the ability to enable LG’s XD processing, with contrast, color and noise settings. The Intelligent Eye ...
Thursday, 13 December 2007 ,  Written by Bill Biersach
title: LET IT BE … NAKED date: December 2003 written by: By Bill Biersach When the Beatles met at Twickenham Film Studios on January 2nd, 1969 to begin work on a new project called Get Back, it was viewed by some as an act of desperation. Though their double-album blockbuster The Beatles, informally known as “The White Album,” was greeted with critical acclaim upon its release the previous November, the group found themselves in something of a quandary. They had ceased touring in the fall of 1966 and had devoted themselves exclusively to the technical intricacies of the recording studio environment, a self-indulgence that produced Sgt. Pepper, Magical Mystery Tour, as well as the songs that would appear in the animated feature Yellow Submarine.
Wednesday, 01 August 2007 ,  Written by Ken Taraszka, MD
Logitech Harmony 1000 Advanced Universal Remote
Introduction The first TV remote was made by Zenith in 1950. Called “Lazy Bones,” it allowed you to change the channels and to turn the TV on and off. It came with a 20-foot wire connecting it to the set. The first wireless remote also came from Zenith in 1955, using a directional flashlight to activate its then-incredible four control functions; the “flashlight” system meant stray sunlight activated functions at any given time. Within a year, Zenith switched to an ultrasonic remote that added almost 30 percent to the cost of the set. This became the first practical remote control. It wasn’t until the early ‘80s that IR (infrared) technology replaced the ultrasonic remotes and, thankfully for us, now we have IR, RF (Radio Frequency), Bluetooth, WiFi and surely more technologies to come. When the first remotes came out, a single remote for your TV was fine. Fast forward 50 years and we now have ...
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