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No Country For Old Men  Print E-mail
Blu-ray Drama
Written by Bryan Dailey   
Saturday, 01 March 2008

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful

Overall rating (weighted)
3.6
Movie Rating:
4.0
Audio Quality:
3.5
Video Quality:
4.0
Supplements:
2.0
Purchase: Buy from Amazon.com
Was this review helpful to you? yes     no
Unless you have been living under a rock you have certainly heard some of the hoopla surrounding the latest film from Joel and Ethan Coen. "No Country For Old Men", adapted for the big screen from the book by author, Cormac McCarthy and released in the fall of 2007, didn’t take theaters by storm but has had a nice steady box office performance thanks to great reviews, word of mouth and now a heaping dose of Oscar statuettes. The timing for the release of this Blu-ray disc was obviously well thought out by the marketing people at Miramax as the buzz on this film has never been higher and it hits the streets about two weeks after it just won the 2007 Oscar for Best Picture of the Year.

On the surface, the film is a fairly simple “cat-and-mouse” story of a small town man named Llewelyn Moss (Josh Brolin), who stumbles on a bundle of cash from a drug deal gone bad and gets in over his head as the “rightful” owner pursues him by any means necessary. Set in a very non-descript time that feels like the early 80s based on the cars and haircuts, the film is a roller coaster of suspense and tension that keeps you on the edge of your seat from start to end.

When it comes to villains, evil has a new name and that name Is Anton Chigurh. First there were Dracula and Frankenstein’s Monster. Then came Darth Vader, Freddy Krueger and Hannibal Lecter. Despite not being a horror film, the villain in "No Country For Old Men," portrayed brilliantly by Spaniard Javier Bardem is absolutely riveting. Everything about him is slow, methodical and insanely maniacal. His weapon of choice is not a knife or a pistol. He goes from place to place, searching for his stolen fortune a little boarder town in Texas wielding a pressurized air gun with a long slender air tank, it is a tool that is used to stun and kill cattle. To the casual observer he looks like a quiet weirdo walking around town with a bad haircut, a strange accent and what looks like an iron lung air container. He cannot only kill a man at close range with this air gun but he can destroy any deadbolt lock on a door in an instant with this thing. If Jack Nicholson had this crafty little weapon back in The Shining, he wouldn’t have had to spend so much time cutting a hole in the bathroom door, but we never would have gotten the “Here’s Johnny” line. When a job calls for more firepower, Chigurh whips out a bizarre shotgun with a silencer on it that make some of Arnold Schwarzenegger’s guns in Terminator look pidly.

Chigurh is so cold and emotionless that at several times in the movie he makes his decision on weather he should kill someone who he runs into on his search for his money based purely on a coin flip. It’s hard to wrap your head around the level of insanity that it would take to have such disregard for human life, yet Chigurh has this bizarre code of ethics where he keeps his word no matter what, so inside, he feel he is actually a good person. I have never seen such a contradiction in someone’s actions compared to his or her internal code of ethics and it took a brilliant performance to make this contradiction come across on screen.

I’m not a movie nerd and I saw very few if any of the other movies that were nominated for Oscars this year but when it came time for best supporting actor, I was 110% confident that Bardem would take the prize for this spectacular performance

Tommy Lee Jones who plays Sheriff Ed Tom Bell gets top billing in this film and you could technically call him the “star” of the film, but relatively speaking his part in the movie is not that big. No Country for Old Men is very much an ensemble film where the screen time and importance of each character is evenly divided. What Sheriff Bell he represents is a small town law man who is simply not ready to deal with the new wave of crime that the cocaine and heroin trade across the boarder from Mexico into the United States and it’s going to take new kinds of weapons and much more advanced technology than is available to a retiring sheriff. In other words the world is changing and now with this new type of criminal, this is no country for old men anymore. The young whippersnappers are going to have to deal with this problem.

Technically speaking, the Blu-ray release of No Country For Old Men is very solid. The transfer is clean, the dialog and sound effects are mixed well, most notably the distinct tone of our villains cattle gun. The sound of deadbolt locks being blasted to smithereens and the back of the lock flying across the room hitting the back wall is startling and perfectly placed in the uncompressed PCM 5.1 surround track.

The extras are exactly the same as those on the standard def DVD release. All of the supplemental material is in standard definition and there is no directory commentary. This seems like a strange omission as the Cohen’s are the most famous director group going (sorry Hughes and Wachowski brothers) and to not get additional insight into the making of this film right from the Cohen brothers mouths will be disappointing for film nerds and wannabe directors. There is a 25 minute “The Making of No Country for Old Men” and a few other little shorts that clock in well under 10 minutes, but “Working with the Coens” and “Diary of a Country Sheriff” are ultimately a little boring and not as insightful as I had hoped. Nonetheless, the film is outstanding on it’s own and the Blu-ray version is simply the best way to see this film if it’s no longer in your local Cineplex.
Studio Miramax Home Entertainment
MPAA Rating R
Starring Tommy Lee Jones, Javier Bardem, Josh Brolin, Woody Harrelson, Kelly Macdonald, Garret Dillahunt, Barry Corbin
Director Ethan & Joel Coen
Film Release Year 2007
Release Year 2008
Resolution(s) 1080p (main feature) • 480i (supplements)
Aspect Ratio 2.35:1
Running Time 2 hr. 2 mins.
Sound Formats English PCM 5.1 • English Dolby Digital 5.1
Subtitles English SDH • French • Spanish
Special Features The Making of "No Country For Old Men", Working with the Coens, Diary of a Country Sheriff, Trailers
Forum Link http://www.avrevforum.com
Reviewer Bryan Dailey







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